US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

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US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby 308Mike » Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:38 am

Linkyroo (Navy Times):

New boot camp ribbon prompts disbelief, jokes
By: Mark D. Faram   August 23, 2015

Image


"Boot camp" — The nickname for the new sailor who shows up at their first ship or squadron.

They're so fresh from recruit training they don't know anything about how the fleet really works — and have only accomplished passing Boot Camp and sometimes "A" school.

Starting Aug. 21, the top honor recruits will receive a special ribbon to commemorate that accomplishment. And they'll show up to the fleet looking less, well, boot camp.

Most new sailors leaving Recruit Training Command Great Lakes, Illinois, do so with a single ribbon: the National Defense Service Medal. But that's not a guarantee. It's only issued during times of national emergency (this time, since Sept. 11, 2001), and it's possible this automatic "geedunk" medal, as it's called, will go away at some point in the future.

On Aug. 20, 15 sailors became the first to be issued the new Navy Basic Military Training Honor Graduate ribbon. It's not quite a "geedunk," since it will only be awarded to the top recruits who attain the status of honor graduate. They were authorized to wear the ribbons the next day when they donned their dress whites and passed in review — marking the end of their basic military training.

"RTC recognizes multiple top performing recruits at graduation, but now the recognition is outwardly visible on an honoree's uniform," Rear Adm. Stephen Evans said in a statement. Evans commands Naval Service Training Command, which oversees all Navy officer and enlisted accession training except for the Naval Academy.

"Wearing of the Honor Grad Ribbon will be a visible sign to peers and superiors at the recipient's future duty stations that the member demonstrated extraordinary excellence and leadership potential during Basic Military Training and is capable of accelerated and increased leadership positions within the Fleet."

But some don't think the ribbon is a cause for celebration. Some lampooned the move while others said it would make the Navy too much like the Air Force, where recruits get a ribbon for completing basic training (the Army, for the record, does this too).

"This is just stupid!" Lee Huffine said in an online comment on an Aug. 19 Navy Times article. "If a recruit is that great, the [Recruit Division Commanders] have the ability to recommend them for advancement to the next paygrade — obviously topping out at E-3."

Honor graduates are routinely awarded meritorious advancements, most often to E-3, and officials say that practice will continue.

The award is effective immediately, approved by Navy Secretary Ray Mabus on Aug. 18, details of which were released in ALNAV message 063/15. Officials said there are no plans to adopt a similar basic training ribbon for officer accession programs, like the Officer Candidate School.

If you were a past honor graduate, don't go out and buy one — there are no retroactive awards. That's something that sticks in the craw of past honor recruits, who think that anyone who can prove it should also be able to wear it. Officials said they decided against making the award retroactive because Navy training standards are constantly evolving and the award is based on current standards.

"Seems like if we are going to recognize Honor Graduates today, then Honor Graduates from the past should also be grandfathered in on this," Jesse Izdepski said in an online comment. "I'm pretty sure there are more than a few folks on active and/or reserve duty that were selected for Honor Grad, and ALSO went on to productive Naval careers."

Navy Secretary Ray Mabus approved the award Aug. 18.

The award was created "to reward recruits for their superb performance during basic military training," a news release said. "The Honor Graduate Ribbon will provide a physical recognition of the sailor's outstanding achievements in academics, physical fitness, recruit leadership and commitment to the Navy core values of honor, courage and commitment."

The award's design and the colors used are intended to reflect those depicted on the Recruit Training Command's emblem, according to Lt. Sean Trophy, NSTC spokesman.

Current Great Lakes officials say the request for the ribbon and the package justifying it was put together by a former NSTC head, Rear Adm. Dee L. Mewbourne, who led the training command from December 2012 to March 2014.

Navy Times asked to talk to Mewbourne about the award and its genesis, but were told through a spokesman at Navy Fleet Forces Command spokesman that the Mewbourne deferred comment , saying it had been too long since he'd left command at Great Lakes.

Capt. Bob Fink, currently the deputy commander of NSTC was Mewbourne's chief of staff when the award was proposed. He said that the decision to propose the award to Navy leadership was made to find a way to honor those who achieve excellence. All awards given by other services for both training completion and those given honor graduates were looked at.

"It was decided that our best recruits, those who showed extraordinary leadership and excellence in training should be recognized," Fink said. "This visible sign of that performance would go forward with them as they moved to the fleet."

Before this award, any recognition of boot camp excellent performance never left Recruit Training Command and wasn't noted in a sailor's record — other than the fact they'd graduated. The Navy, Fink said, wanted to limit their award to only the best performing recruits.

That's why, he said, the rules allow no more than three percent of the graduates from each weekly training group get the honor grad nod. The ribbon will rank 83rd in the Navy's award order of precedence, just below the Navy Ceremonial Guard Ribbon and above the Coast Guard Special Operations Ribbon. For comparison, the National Defense Service Medal ranks 62nd on that list.

Image

Seaman Recruit Joseph Agbingpadua receives the first Recruit Honor Graduate Ribbon on Aug. 20 during his pass-in-review rehearsal.
Photo Credit: Susan Krawczyk/Navy

GREAT LAKES, Ill. (August 20, 2015) -- Seaman Recruit Joseph V. Agbingpadua, of Mission Hills, Calif., receives the first Recruit Honor Graduate Ribbon during his Pass-In-Review (PIR) rehearsal in the Midway Ceremonial Drill Hall at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Aug. 20. The Honorable Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus approved the award to recognize initial accession enlisted personnel who demonstrate superior performance throughout basic military training in the areas of academics, physical readiness, recruit leadership and commitment to the Navy Core Values. Honor Graduates earning the ribbon will be authorized to wear it during the PIR graduation ceremony held on most Friday during the year. No more than 3 percent of graduates from each training group will be designated as Honor Graduates. (U.S. Navy Photo by Susan Krawczyk/RELEASED)


Newly minted Fireman Joseph Agbingpadua was a top graduate in Recruit Division 281 and was among the first 15 graduating recruits to get the ribbon. The Mission Hills, California, native will attend machinist mate "A" school before heading to the fleet.

"It's a huge honor to get this award and to be one of the first," he said in an Aug. 20 interview with Navy Times. "It's everything, it really is, and it's a great way to end my time here."

"The physical stress and stress you go through here to impress your [Recruit Division Commanders] ... while still learning all that we're required isn't easy and this award shows that our hard work paid off and that in the Navy, hard work is rewarded."

The Navy is the third service to create an award for their top boot camp graduates. Both the Air Force and the Coast Guard offer similar awards.

The Air Force Basic Military Training Honor Graduate Ribbon was created in 1976 and is awarded to no more than 10 percent of each graduating "flight" of recruits. To net the ribbon, they must achieve a 90 percent or higher on all physical fitness tests and written examinations. In addition, they cannot have any negative marks for any inspections or in any written evaluation. Like the Navy's award, it was not awarded retroactively to anyone prior to 1976.

The Coast Guard's Basic Training Honor Graduate Ribbon criteria for their award, created in 1983 is simple — it's simply presented to the top graduate in each class. Their award was allowed to be given retroactively.

But interestingly, the Navy doesn't recognize those ribbons. An Air Force or Coast Guard member who transfers to the Navy are not permitted to wear either ribbon on a Navy uniform, according to the Navy's awards manual.

Image

Seaman Recruit Richard Cassube, left, assists Seaman Recruit Jeremy Cryer with the proper measurements of the ribbons on his dress uniform in preparation for their upcoming graduation at Recruit Training Command (RTC). Cassube and Cryer are among the first 15 recruits to receive the Recruit Honor Graduate Ribbon.

Photo Credit: Susan Krawczyk/Navy


In addition, the Air Force and Army have ribbons awarded to everyone who completes basic military training.

GREAT LAKES, Ill. (August 20, 2015) -- Seaman Recruit Richard Cassube, of Roy, Wash., left, assists Seaman Recruit Jeremy Cryer, of Gilbert, Ariz., with the proper measurements of the ribbons on his dress uniform in preparation for their upcoming graduation at Recruit Training Command (RTC). Cassube and Cryer are among the first 15 recruits to receive the Recruit Honor Graduate Ribbon. The Honorable Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus approved the award to recognize initial accession enlisted personnel who demonstrate superior performance throughout basic military training in the areas of academics, physical readiness, recruit leadership and commitment to the Navy Core Values. Honor Graduates earning the ribbon will be authorized to wear it during the PIR graduation ceremony held on most Friday during the year. No more than 3 percent of graduates from each training group will be designated as Honor Graduates. (U.S. Navy Photo by Susan Krawczyk, RELEASED)

The Air Force Training Ribbon was created in 1980 and was immediately expanded to include anyone completing training after Aug. 14, 1974. A later update qualified anyone who had ever completed the training. If an airman later goes through an Air Force commissioning program and becomes an officer, they get an oak leaf cluster to fix to their ribbon.

The Army's award is a little different. The Army Service Ribbon isn't awarded after boot camp, but after soldiers complete their military occupational specialty training. Soldiers given their MOS due to civilian acquired skills — common in the National Guard and Army Reserve — net the award after four months of successful service, according to Army rules.

Soldiers and airmen awarded these medals, however, are not allowed to wear them should they transfer to or later join the Navy or Navy Reserve.

In terms of basic training medals, the Marine Corps stands alone and plans to stay that way.

"The Marine Corps has no plans in the works for creation of an Honor Graduate Ribbon for top recruits graduating from the Marine Corps Recruit Depots," said Maj. Thomas Dolan, a Marine spokesman at Manpower and Reserve Affairs, which oversees awards.

Sources tell Navy Times that Marine leadership considers the coveted "EGA" — the Eagle, Globe and Anchor awarded to enlisted personnel at the end of boot camp and officers upon commissioning — as symbol enough.

The first recruits to receive the Navy Basic Military Training Honor Graduate ribbon are:
SR Jamie L. Murray, Div. 275, Knoxville, Tennessee
SR Matthew P. Jones, Div. 276, Denver, Colorado
SR Brittany M. Walker, Div. 277, Austin, Texas
SR Renata Y. Choi, Div. 278, Buena Park, California
SR Carlin E. Hatcher, Div. 279, Birmingham, Alabama
SR Richard M. Cassube III, Div. 280, Roy, Washington
SR Stephen E. McGahey, Div. 281, Upland, Indiana
SR Allison A. Rivera-Medina, Div. 282, Yonkers, New York
SR Garrett M. Firestone, Div. 941, Yuma, Arizona
SR Joseph V. Agbingpadua, Div. 281, Mission Hills, California
SR Jeremy J. Cryer, Div. 279, Gilbert, Arizona
SR Hunter D. Morrow, Div. 281, Cherokee, Iowa
SR Bethany M. Vikowski, Div. 279, Medina, Ohio
SR Timothy A. Seybold, Div. 281, Virginia Beach, Virginia
SR James D. Bell III, Div. 275, Freeport, Illinois

Staff writer Gina Harkins contributed to this report.

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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby Netpackrat » Thu Jan 04, 2018 4:56 am

What is that "camouflage" pattern designed to blend in with?
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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby 308Mike » Thu Jan 04, 2018 5:11 am

Netpackrat wrote:What is that "camouflage" pattern designed to blend in with?

I would guess, the ship, making it difficult to target them individually (if that really mattered much), so now they've changed to more shore-based camo pattern, with tans and green. The old pattern has a nick-name of "blueberry camo", we'll see what they come up with for the new color scheme (makes me wonder what their criteria is for the colors selection).
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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby Netpackrat » Thu Jan 04, 2018 5:51 am

It looks more like "man overboard" camo to me...
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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby Vonz90 » Thu Jan 04, 2018 2:11 pm

Netpackrat wrote:It looks more like "man overboard" camo to me...


Exactly, it is so you cannot be found if you fall overboard, because F-you if you do.

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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby Netpackrat » Fri Jan 05, 2018 4:40 am

Vonz90 wrote:
Netpackrat wrote:It looks more like "man overboard" camo to me...


Exactly, it is so you cannot be found if you fall overboard, because F-you if you do.


I guess if that's the attitude of the officer corps, it's a little hard to blame that sailor for hiding out aboard ship.
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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby Steamforger » Fri Jan 05, 2018 8:23 pm

There's a weird culture of 20+ hour workdays, Five and Dimes schedules, increased ops tempo and tasking, and a deep, blatant double standard between enlisted and officer leadership vs crew.

Topping this off is a fervent belief that if leadership had to suffer when they were junior enlisted, then everybody else needs to suffer too.

I don't think I could, in good conscious recommend the Navy to anybody right now.

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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby Vonz90 » Fri Jan 05, 2018 9:47 pm

Steamforger wrote:There's a weird culture of 20+ hour workdays, Five and Dimes schedules, increased ops tempo and tasking, and a deep, blatant double standard between enlisted and officer leadership vs crew.

Topping this off is a fervent belief that if leadership had to suffer when they were junior enlisted, then everybody else needs to suffer too.

I don't think I could, in good conscious recommend the Navy to anybody right now.


Relative the SWO Navy, it really really depends on the ship, Captain and Department head for an O and Divo / Chief / WCS for an E.

The 20 hour work weeks and high op tempo are part of the game unfortunately when in a work up or deployment. The good commands know how to balance it out with some flexibility when it is possible, the bad ones drive in the screws.

That said, having seen how the Army does things on a couple of deployments, I do not think the Nav compares particularly unfavorably. The standard answer for everything is suck it up no matter how much it fucks with people to no benefit and no matter how easy it would be to ameliorate.

I would discuss the Air Farce, but I figure I will limit the discussion to the military.

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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby Rich » Fri Jan 05, 2018 10:41 pm

Vonz90 wrote:I would discuss the Air Farce, but I figure I will limit the discussion to the military.


Trolling?
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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby First Shirt » Sat Jan 06, 2018 3:10 am

Vonz90 wrote:I would discuss the Air Farce, but I figure I will limit the discussion to the military.


Like a squid would know?
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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby JKosprey » Sat Jan 06, 2018 3:35 pm

Netpackrat wrote:What is that "camouflage" pattern designed to blend in with?


My understanding is that it's not actually meant to be camo. It's supposed to hide paint stains better than the old one-color coveralls, allowing for a longer "serviceable uniform" time. Of course, if the navy just didn't expect people to stay clean while painting, it wouldn't be a problem.

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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby Steamforger » Sat Jan 06, 2018 7:41 pm

I thought my CoC had gone insane when they came up with "inspection disagrees." It was confirmed when they decided we should be unrepping in "inspection disagrees."

For the uninitiated, unreps are dirty affairs. Lots of different types of grease, fuel oils, sea dye markers running all over you (they stain everything orange), etc. You would essentially have to have a new uniform for every day. Which is double plus unpossible.

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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby Frankingun » Wed Jan 10, 2018 5:53 pm

Looking from the outside in, as in never in any military, I’m wondering, why doesn’t the Navy provide some kind of official coverall for dirty work?
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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby randy » Wed Jan 10, 2018 6:49 pm

Frankingun wrote:Looking from the outside in, as in never in any military, I’m wondering, why doesn’t the Navy provide some kind of official coverall for dirty work?


Because that would make sense
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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby First Shirt » Wed Jan 10, 2018 6:55 pm

randy wrote:
Frankingun wrote:Looking from the outside in, as in never in any military, I’m wondering, why doesn’t the Navy provide some kind of official coverall for dirty work?


Because that would make sense


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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby Cobar » Wed Jan 10, 2018 7:55 pm

First Shirt wrote:First rule of military thinking: If it makes sense, you've probably done it wrong.


This is why military intelligence is an oxymoron.

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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby Vonz90 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 9:57 pm

Frankingun wrote:Looking from the outside in, as in never in any military, I’m wondering, why doesn’t the Navy provide some kind of official coverall for dirty work?


They do and have for years. The fight is between those who want them worn all the time, those who only want them for very limited cases, and when those cases would apply or not.

On a ship, the CO has more or less complete authority set policy for that sort of thing.

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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby Rich » Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:29 pm

In simple words, a work uniform technically exists to be worn to perform work. However there exists those among us who wish those who work to look sharp at all times to bring pride to the organisation, at least in their minds. The Army had a word for this. The word was Strac (sp).

As a former avionics technician I can tell you it is hard to look presentable while covered in grease and hydraulic fluid along with crusted sweat salts after twelve hours on a triple digit flight-line and be expected to look sharp at all times. Yet some who held the power of command over me not only expected it, but demanded it.

As long as we have these squirrels in command positions this problem won't change.

I believe this has been discussed as part of The Peter Principle. ;)
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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby First Shirt » Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:51 pm

Rich wrote:In simple words, a work uniform technically exists to be worn to perform work. However there exists those among us who wish those who work to look sharp at all times to bring pride to the organisation, at least in their minds. The Army had a word for this. The word was Strac (sp).

As a former avionics technician I can tell you it is hard to look presentable while covered in grease and hydraulic fluid along with crusted sweat salts after twelve hours on a triple digit flight-line and be expected to look sharp at all times. Yet some who held the power of command over me not only expected it, but demanded it.

As long as we have these squirrels in command positions this problem won't change.

I believe this has been discussed as part of The Peter Principle. ;)


Yet another argument in favor of requiring officer candidates to serve at least one hitch as enlisted.
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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby Vonz90 » Thu Jan 11, 2018 1:11 am

First Shirt wrote:
Rich wrote:In simple words, a work uniform technically exists to be worn to perform work. However there exists those among us who wish those who work to look sharp at all times to bring pride to the organisation, at least in their minds. The Army had a word for this. The word was Strac (sp).

As a former avionics technician I can tell you it is hard to look presentable while covered in grease and hydraulic fluid along with crusted sweat salts after twelve hours on a triple digit flight-line and be expected to look sharp at all times. Yet some who held the power of command over me not only expected it, but demanded it.

As long as we have these squirrels in command positions this problem won't change.

I believe this has been discussed as part of The Peter Principle. ;)


Yet another argument in favor of requiring officer candidates to serve at least one hitch as enlisted.


This would not necessarily work out the way you would want. Some of O's I knew who were the biggest assholes to the enlisted were Mustangs.

Some former enlisted make great officers, a lot of them make absolutely horrible officers. There is not a lot in between.

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Re: US Navy has a Ribbon for Boot Camp Honor Grads

Postby First Shirt » Thu Jan 11, 2018 1:42 am

With one exception, the best officers I served under were mustangs. The exception was an Aluminum U grad, who was probably one of the best officers I ever knew.

During the Great Tree-Cutting Incident, in Korea (1976), we were on alert for 30 days, working all the hours we could put in, running mission aircraft 24/7. Our LT (the Aluminum U grad), during the morning pre-mission brief (about 10 days in) said, "We're all working our butts off, and we're all getting pretty tired. From now on, nobody is to be on duty for more than 12 hours."

The mission supervisor raised his hand, and the LT said "Yes, MSgt O.?"

"Does that go for everybody, sir?"

"Yes it goes for everyone!"

"Bullshit, sir, 'cause I know for a fact that you haven't been off this hill for 3 fuckin' days!"

First time I ever saw AF enlisted personnel cheering an officer!!!
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