SafeSaw

Discussion of all things technological and/or gadgety
John_in_Longview
Case Shiner
Posts: 471
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 7:30 pm
Location: East Texas

SafeSaw

Postby John_in_Longview » Mon Dec 08, 2014 6:18 pm

I want a table saw, but I am a computer programmer and need my fingers. The SafeSaw looks like the perfect fit. Has anyone heard anything bad (or good) about them?

Thanks,
John

User avatar
PawPaw
Active Shooter
Posts: 4493
Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2009 9:19 pm
Location: Pineville, Louisiana

Re: SafeSaw

Postby PawPaw » Mon Dec 08, 2014 6:32 pm

If it works for you, then it works. Though, I've been using table saws for years, and I have my all my fingers. Actually, with most table saws today, accidents are pretty rare, and if you're counting on the safety features of a saw to keep your fingers out of the blade, you probably won't be counting with all your fingers for long.

Table saws are dangerous, so you've got to keep your head in the game so that your fingers don't fall on the floor.
Dennis Dezendorf
PawPaw's House

Precision
Active Shooter
Posts: 4571
Joined: Wed Aug 20, 2008 7:01 pm
Location: Florida

Re: SafeSaw

Postby Precision » Mon Dec 08, 2014 6:45 pm

I agree with Paw Paw.

My tablesaw, a mid range one from Sears came with a blade guard that lifts up as you edge the wood in. A good safety feature, except that it was designed wrong and had way too much lateral slop. After it engaged the blade for the 3rd or so time, off it came. The blade had only engaged the plastic edge, but under different circumstances it could engage the metal and... we'll just say that would potentially have the ability to overwhelm my normal eye protection among other things.

That guard has long been off. Call it seven plus years. I can't think of ONE time it has been missed, but I pay attention when I have the machine running and when off, the blade is kept under the height of the fence and the fence is stored about 3/4" away from the blade and the saw is unplugged.

Safety, familiarity with capacity and capability, use push sticks and stand off tools and a sharp blade are all very important. Then being alert, aware, safe are also important. Then when you are deciding to freeform something, or work a little at the edge of the capacity, be Very Cautious, be very safe and use push sticks and the like and be sure someone is around in case.

Kickback and temporary binds that let loose are the big "I didn't see that coming" items that get you if you work while tired or are distracted. Other then that, cutting through a board with a nail in it and other random stuff are a small issue to be aware of. After that it is mainly knowing your and the machine's capacities and staying within them and within the safety margins.

Much less dangerous then an electric chainsaw.
"Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not." ~Thomas Jefferson
My little part of the blogosphere. http://blogletitburn.wordpress.com/

MarkD
Active Shooter
Posts: 3821
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 6:59 pm
Contact:

Re: SafeSaw

Postby MarkD » Mon Dec 08, 2014 7:10 pm

I've read about those Safesaws. Bear in mind, that when triggered they destroy themselves AND your blade. Also, IIRC they need to be disengaged if you cut metal or they'll trigger, an expensive mistake.

User avatar
JAG2955
Active Shooter
Posts: 3044
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 10:21 pm

Re: SafeSaw

Postby JAG2955 » Mon Dec 08, 2014 7:14 pm

The Camp Lejeune woodshop had one. It had 4 paper hands next to it for the four times saved a finger or more when it was triggered. The owner/inventor or whatever was the guy who sold it to them. I was told that when they demo'd it, he would fire it up and ask people which finger he should use to stop it. Each time, the cut was just the tiniest nick, akin to a shaving cut.

If I live out in the boonies, I will likely invest in one.

User avatar
Steamforger
On a list somewhere
Posts: 2784
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 6:41 pm

Re: SafeSaw

Postby Steamforger » Mon Dec 08, 2014 7:53 pm

The inventor is a bit of a dick as well. His opinion is you should only be able to buy his saw. By all accounts, the safe saw works very well. I also seem to remember reading that woods with a high moisture content can also trigger the mechanism. Triggers are very expensive, though, how much is a finger worth to you?

I'd say get one if you feel you need to. Otherwise, knowing how a conventional saw works and operating within those boundaries safely will likely work out just fine.

John_in_Longview
Case Shiner
Posts: 471
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 7:30 pm
Location: East Texas

Re: SafeSaw

Postby John_in_Longview » Mon Dec 08, 2014 8:58 pm

Thanks for all the comments. A finger is worth a lot to me, so the cost of the saw, and of replacing the brake and the blades isn't an issue. I plan to do all the things you do with a non-SafeSaw when cutting: blade only as high as it needs to be, use push sticks, watch what you are doing. I have no plans to cut metal, just wood. My main concerns about the SafeSaw are 1) it didn't work as advertised or 2) couldn't actually cut wood as it is supposed to.

BDK
Trigger Junkie
Posts: 1319
Joined: Sat Jun 21, 2014 12:14 am

Re: SafeSaw

Postby BDK » Mon Dec 08, 2014 9:04 pm

But then who would we get to call Stumpy?

If you think you might need one, you probably do - but never rely on it.

Remember, with machines, horses and cattle - they are all looking actively looking to kill you, they're just waiting for your back to be turned.

User avatar
Yogimus
Active Shooter
Posts: 4922
Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2011 7:32 am
Contact:

Re: SafeSaw

Postby Yogimus » Mon Dec 08, 2014 9:20 pm

...as he severs his finger with a pocket knife opening the box...

Aesop
Good Christ I Need A Life
Posts: 6149
Joined: Sat Apr 27, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Califrutopia
Contact:

Re: SafeSaw

Postby Aesop » Mon Dec 08, 2014 9:58 pm

A "Safe Saw" is about like "Jumbo Shrimp" and "Military Music".
Presumably when (not if) the device fails, you will write the company with your left hand to demand a settlement and refund?

High speed moving machinery eats the body parts of the careless and clueless.
Don't be that guy.
I have been the or a construction medic on any number of productions with guys who do this stuff for a living.
As most "safety" features were designed by someone who never uses the equipment twice in one lifetime, and never under actual production conditions, most either fall off or are actively deliberately removed, because they're Rube Goldberg-designed PITAs, and future accidents waiting to happen.
There is no commensurate rain of severed body parts, because people who like their body parts make a conscious effort not to feed them to the machinery.

Using tools the way they're designed, within their working functional limits, in a proper work space, and with properly clean, maintained, and sharp cutting surfaces, solves about 90% of most potential accidents. Most of the rest are induced by people working beyond their own attentiveness/intelligence, which nothing will fix.

OTOH, a properly utilized push stick never spurts blood or screams when kissed by a saw blade, and no one bright enough to work with power tools has ever said "Gee, I wish I hadn't worn my safety equipment."
"There are four types of homicide: felonious, accidental, justifiable, and praiseworthy." -Ambrose Bierce, "The Devil's Dictionary"

User avatar
blackeagle603
Probably Unemployed
Posts: 8974
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 5:13 am
Location: SoCal
Contact:

Re: SafeSaw

Postby blackeagle603 » Mon Dec 08, 2014 10:38 pm

Anti-kickback device on my old Craftsman saw is more of a hazard and hindrance than a help. Collecting dust in the corner it is. I've been meaning to make a simple splitter.

Thus far I've been good with a properly sized insert for the blade, push sticks and featherboards. Maybe someday I'll cough up the dough and give some featherwheels a try.
"The Guncounter: More fun than a barrel of tattooed knife-fighting chain-smoking monkey butlers with drinking problems and excessive gambling debts!"

"The right of the citizens to keep and bear arms has justly been considered, as the palladium of the liberties of a republic;" Justice Story

tfbncc
Loose Cannon
Posts: 793
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 3:00 am
Location: NE Florida

Re: SafeSaw

Postby tfbncc » Mon Dec 08, 2014 10:41 pm

The Safe Saw works and works well by all accounts. But like the four rules of firearms handling, there are basic rules of operating power machinery safely that should always be followed:

Eye and ear protection, always!

No jewelry. This includes wedding rings and writstwatches and especially necklaces.

No loose clothes, shirts, preferably short sleeve. There is a really gruesome video on youtube somewhere of an industrial lathe operator who had on a long sleeve flannel shirt with the cuffs loose and unbottoned. The lathe caught the cuff and he was history.

Push sticks and sleds are your best friends.

These rules were taught to me by my Grandfather (cabinet maker and production carpenter) and my Father (Tool and Die maker). Never give a power tool a chance to hook onto you and you will be happier for a lot longer.

User avatar
PawPaw
Active Shooter
Posts: 4493
Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2009 9:19 pm
Location: Pineville, Louisiana

Re: SafeSaw

Postby PawPaw » Mon Dec 08, 2014 10:47 pm

BDK wrote:But then who would we get to call Stumpy?

Actually, Stumpy was a guy who worked for an electric utility in northwest LA. Some weird accident, he climbed out of his truck and his bucket was touching a downed power line, and somehow the charge exited through his pecker and blew it off. Weird, strange set of events.

But he was Stumpy until he retired. I think that a sports physician took him as a project and got a surgeon to give him some help, maybe did some reconstruction or something. Guy didn't like to talk about it. But, shure-as-shit, we called him Stumpy.
Dennis Dezendorf
PawPaw's House

User avatar
g-man
Trigger Junkie
Posts: 1060
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 5:40 pm
Location: Northern Calfrutopia
Contact:

Re: SafeSaw

Postby g-man » Mon Dec 08, 2014 10:50 pm

Entry level SafeSaw ~$1700
Equivalent 'Tablesaw' ~$500

I'd have another $1199 worth of other tools and 10x 10¢ paint-stirrer push-sticks. Dad nicked a finger with a tablesaw when I was a kid. Didn't put 2+2 together on it until reading this thread, but it just occurred to me that it happened long after I'd gone to bed (fatigue a factor much?). I tend to be pretty wary around power tools as a result. Didn't stop me from needing two stitches due to a coconut knife-fight accident (Hint: get the coconut milk out the way the locals do), but haven't so much as gotten a scratch from electrically driven implements.
Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum

User avatar
PawPaw
Active Shooter
Posts: 4493
Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2009 9:19 pm
Location: Pineville, Louisiana

Re: SafeSaw

Postby PawPaw » Mon Dec 08, 2014 10:50 pm

Whatever you decide to buy, get a couple of featherboards, and learn to use them. They're very helpful in making straight, accurate cuts.

LINKY>
Dennis Dezendorf
PawPaw's House

User avatar
Steamforger
On a list somewhere
Posts: 2784
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 6:41 pm

Re: SafeSaw

Postby Steamforger » Mon Dec 08, 2014 10:55 pm

John_in_Longview wrote:Thanks for all the comments. A finger is worth a lot to me, so the cost of the saw, and of replacing the brake and the blades isn't an issue. I plan to do all the things you do with a non-SafeSaw when cutting: blade only as high as it needs to be, use push sticks, watch what you are doing. I have no plans to cut metal, just wood. My main concerns about the SafeSaw are 1) it didn't work as advertised or 2) couldn't actually cut wood as it is supposed to.


That's the line the inventor is pushing. If his is the safe saw, all others are not no matter how safely operated. Don't fall into that line of thinking. As others have stated, you can operate the conventional table saw safely and people have been doing so for generations.

You must do what you feel is right, of course...

User avatar
Darrell
Good Christ I Need A Life
Posts: 6586
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 12:12 am
Location: Colorado

Re: SafeSaw

Postby Darrell » Mon Dec 08, 2014 11:43 pm

Steamforger wrote:The inventor is a bit of a dick as well. His opinion is you should only be able to buy his saw. By all accounts, the safe saw works very well. I also seem to remember reading that woods with a high moisture content can also trigger the mechanism. Triggers are very expensive, though, how much is a finger worth to you?

I'd say get one if you feel you need to. Otherwise, knowing how a conventional saw works and operating within those boundaries safely will likely work out just fine.

I believe I wrote about the Safe Saw a few years ago, after taking part of my trigger finger off with a table saw at work. Classic case of a southpaw dealing with a right handed world, the layout of the machine (actually a specialty diemaking saw) isn't very lefty friendly. I barely nicked the side of my left index fingertip, still mangled it pretty good. That finger is now a bit shorter than the right index digit, with a misshapen nail. I must admit, I was not using the guard, which was in very poor condition. I made a new guard for the machine, which completely covers the blade, and rises to allow the wood to pass under.
Eppur si muove--Galileo

rightisright
Active Shooter
Posts: 4269
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 10:41 pm
Location: NJ

Re: SafeSaw

Postby rightisright » Mon Dec 08, 2014 11:47 pm

What are you looking to do w. the saw? Cabinet work, trim work, heavy ripping? What kind/type of wood?

I have several that all serve different purposes. The Jet in the shop is the big guy hooked up to a cyclone dust collector. Two jobsite DeWalts reside in trailers and a small tabletop Makita is in one of the vans.

The DeWalts do about 90% of the work. They are accurate and smooth enough for on-site trim work (mostly pine or oak). The Makita is great if you just need to make a few light rips.

The Jet excels w. large panels of fine plywood and dense hardwoods. I used to build a lot of Ipe (aka Ironwood, Brazilian Walnut, Pao Lope) decks (not so much anymore due to the advances of synthetic decking material). Ipe is beautiful but an absolute bitch to work with. It's three times harder than oak and produces a very fine lung-irritating dust when cut. The Jet and dust system more than paid for themselves after the first Ipe job many moons ago.

Like the others said, push sticks, hold downs and feather boards are your friends.

User avatar
HTRN
Probably Unemployed
Posts: 10855
Joined: Wed Aug 20, 2008 4:05 am
Location: Under your bed with a knife
Contact:

Re: SafeSaw

Postby HTRN » Tue Dec 09, 2014 9:33 am

Steamforger wrote:The inventor is a bit of a dick as well.

The inventor of "Sawstop", Steve Gass is a rentseeking asshole. When he tried to license his idea to the various saw manufacturers, they all turned him down(basically, they saw it as an admission of liability), so he started his own saw company with his tech, but apparently this wasn't enough for him - he sought the CPSC to make his technology the standard, which would make him piles of money in royalties.
HTRN, I would tell you that you are an evil fucker, but you probably get that a lot ~ Netpackrat

Describing what HTRN does as "antics" is like describing the wreck of the Titanic as "a minor boating incident" ~ First Shirt

User avatar
evan price
Trigger Junkie
Posts: 1785
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 11:24 am
Location: OH-IO The heart of it all!

Re: SafeSaw

Postby evan price » Tue Dec 09, 2014 12:25 pm

For the price of a 3hp SawStop saw you can get a 5hp Jet or something else much more commercial and have change left over to buy some blades or a dado pack.
I used to work in industrial machine building, if you get the operators to believe that the machine will keep them safe you are training operators to get hurt. They need to be aware of what they are doing and involved in their own safety.
One story circling the trade is of a Big Three parts tamping plant that used to have the operators wear wristbands attached with cables to an interrupter at the top of the press. As the press began the downstroke it would pull the operator's hands back from the die set.
One day an operator had both his hands lopped off. He'd just come back from break and forgot to connect the cables. He had gotten used to the press pulling his hands out for him, and he didn't even bother to do it himself anymore.
Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc

http://ohioccwforums.org/
Ohioans for Concealed Carry:THE source for Ohio CCW information and discussion!

User avatar
Netpackrat
Probably Unemployed
Posts: 12396
Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2008 12:04 am
Location: Anchorage, AK

Re: SafeSaw

Postby Netpackrat » Tue Dec 09, 2014 10:15 pm

HTRN wrote:
Steamforger wrote:The inventor is a bit of a dick as well.

The inventor of "Sawstop", Steve Gass is a rentseeking asshole. When he tried to license his idea to the various saw manufacturers, they all turned him down(basically, they saw it as an admission of liability), so he started his own saw company with his tech, but apparently this wasn't enough for him - he sought the CPSC to make his technology the standard, which would make him piles of money in royalties.


This. Fuck that guy.
Cognosce teipsum et disce pati

"People come and go in our lives, especially the online ones. Some leave a fond memory, and some a bad taste." -Aesop

User avatar
MiddleAgedKen
On a list somewhere
Posts: 2396
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 9:11 pm
Location: Flyover Country
Contact:

Re: SafeSaw

Postby MiddleAgedKen » Tue Dec 09, 2014 10:46 pm

Perzackly. How do you think child-seat laws got to be ubiquitous?
Watergate didn't have a body count.

User avatar
Netpackrat
Probably Unemployed
Posts: 12396
Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2008 12:04 am
Location: Anchorage, AK

Re: SafeSaw

Postby Netpackrat » Wed Dec 10, 2014 3:24 am

MiddleAgedKen wrote:Perzackly. How do you think child-seat laws got to be ubiquitous?


Or mandatory insurance laws.
Cognosce teipsum et disce pati

"People come and go in our lives, especially the online ones. Some leave a fond memory, and some a bad taste." -Aesop

John_in_Longview
Case Shiner
Posts: 471
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 7:30 pm
Location: East Texas

Re: SafeSaw

Postby John_in_Longview » Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:15 am

PawPaw wrote:Whatever you decide to buy, get a couple of featherboards, and learn to use them. They're very helpful in making straight, accurate cuts.

LINKY>


Thanks for the link, PawPaw.

John_in_Longview
Case Shiner
Posts: 471
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 7:30 pm
Location: East Texas

Re: SafeSaw

Postby John_in_Longview » Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:16 am

rightisright wrote:What are you looking to do w. the saw? Cabinet work, trim work, heavy ripping? What kind/type of wood?


I will mainly be building bookshelves and canned food cabinets for the house. Nothing too fancy and I don't plan to use dense woods. This is for weekend, DIY stuff.
Last edited by John_in_Longview on Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:21 am, edited 1 time in total.

John_in_Longview
Case Shiner
Posts: 471
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 7:30 pm
Location: East Texas

Re: SafeSaw

Postby John_in_Longview » Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:20 am

HTRN wrote:The inventor of "Sawstop", Steve Gass is a rentseeking asshole. When he tried to license his idea to the various saw manufacturers, they all turned him down(basically, they saw it as an admission of liability), so he started his own saw company with his tech....


Very cool on his part.

HTRN wrote:....,but apparently this wasn't enough for him - he sought the CPSC to make his technology the standard, which would make him piles of money in royalties.


Mega-uncool on his part. If table saws were so dangerous that they were maiming people right and left, and he sells this new technology to prevent it, the free market would drive sales to him.

User avatar
arctictom
Active Shooter
Posts: 3203
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:57 pm
Location: Fairbanks Alaska
Contact:

Re: SafeSaw

Postby arctictom » Wed Dec 10, 2014 7:46 am

Been using table saws for decades , no problems , with power tools you need to pay attention all the time. Not really an issue for most people. I have a small portable Dewald that suits/fits what I do , and I love it.
You live and learn.
Or you don't live long.

User avatar
Netpackrat
Probably Unemployed
Posts: 12396
Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2008 12:04 am
Location: Anchorage, AK

Re: SafeSaw

Postby Netpackrat » Wed Dec 10, 2014 1:22 pm

I think the asshole's patents start expiring in 2017. :twisted:
Cognosce teipsum et disce pati

"People come and go in our lives, especially the online ones. Some leave a fond memory, and some a bad taste." -Aesop

rightisright
Active Shooter
Posts: 4269
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 10:41 pm
Location: NJ

Re: SafeSaw

Postby rightisright » Wed Dec 10, 2014 5:04 pm

John_in_Longview wrote:
rightisright wrote:What are you looking to do w. the saw? Cabinet work, trim work, heavy ripping? What kind/type of wood?


I will mainly be building bookshelves and canned food cabinets for the house. Nothing too fancy and I don't plan to use dense woods. This is for weekend, DIY stuff.


Do you have a dedicated space for it? Or will you be wheeling it out of the way when done? 110v or 220v?

If you are using 120v and need to move it, a contractor saw is your best bet. I have 2 slightly older versions of this guy w. a stand: http://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DW745-10-I ... dewalt+744

The saw/stand folds up nicely and tucks away into a dedicated space in a work trailer. I've replaced a few parts here and there over the years. But all in all, I would highly recommend this saw. Also, DeWalt makes a throat plate that is meant for dado blades if you are going to make dado/rabbet joints.

If you are looking for more rip capacity, there is this guy: http://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DWE7491RS- ... +table+saw

Above that, you will be looking at larger 110/220 convertible models which will be more expensive and heavier (heavier is good for stationary units as it cuts down on vibration): http://www.amazon.com/Jet-708492K-JPS-1 ... +table+saw
Last edited by rightisright on Wed Dec 10, 2014 11:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Aesop
Good Christ I Need A Life
Posts: 6149
Joined: Sat Apr 27, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Califrutopia
Contact:

Re: SafeSaw

Postby Aesop » Wed Dec 10, 2014 5:53 pm

John_in_Longview wrote:
rightisright wrote:What are you looking to do w. the saw? Cabinet work, trim work, heavy ripping? What kind/type of wood?


I will mainly be building bookshelves and canned food cabinets for the house. Nothing too fancy and I don't plan to use dense woods. This is for weekend, DIY stuff.


Unless you're going for Norm Abrams' level of beauty and quality, as opposed to pure functionality, there's nothing in that you can't accomplish with a cordless handheld 18V DeWalt or equivalent. As my library and DVD collections' resting places will attest.

A contractor saw will obviously give you more power for bigger projects, more stability for more critical cuts, and the ability to use dado blades for stacked cuts, but at the risk of greater injury in case of a screw-up.
For simply making short straight cuts in 1"x (mostly pine/plywood) material for shelves and such, get a good handheld, and a spare battery to alternate charging one while working with the other, and you can work it all day long, with little more risk to your fingers or other body parts than if using scissors (presuming you aren't cutting boards braced against your femoral artery), using nothing but a small worktable or even a pair of sturdy sawhorses. (If needs be, you can construct those yourself first, using the same saw.)

The sound impact on the household and neighbors is also commensurately less than a contractor or table saw, if that's a factor.
If you have a shop on a lonely acre, you can test missiles.
If you're putting something together in an apartment or a condo, the pounding on the door will soon outdo the noise of the saw.

And you can take the thing where you need it for other projects.

The other $1200 you didn't spend on the Smart Saw will buy a lot of project lumber.
"There are four types of homicide: felonious, accidental, justifiable, and praiseworthy." -Ambrose Bierce, "The Devil's Dictionary"

MarkD
Active Shooter
Posts: 3821
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 6:59 pm
Contact:

Re: SafeSaw

Postby MarkD » Wed Dec 10, 2014 10:25 pm

Aesop wrote:
John_in_Longview wrote:
rightisright wrote:What are you looking to do w. the saw? Cabinet work, trim work, heavy ripping? What kind/type of wood?


I will mainly be building bookshelves and canned food cabinets for the house. Nothing too fancy and I don't plan to use dense woods. This is for weekend, DIY stuff.


Unless you're going for Norm Abrams' level of beauty and quality, as opposed to pure functionality, there's nothing in that you can't accomplish with a cordless handheld 18V DeWalt or equivalent. As my library and DVD collections' resting places will attest.

A contractor saw will obviously give you more power for bigger projects, more stability for more critical cuts, and the ability to use dado blades for stacked cuts, but at the risk of greater injury in case of a screw-up.
For simply making short straight cuts in 1"x (mostly pine/plywood) material for shelves and such, get a good handheld, and a spare battery to alternate charging one while working with the other, and you can work it all day long, with little more risk to your fingers or other body parts than if using scissors (presuming you aren't cutting boards braced against your femoral artery), using nothing but a small worktable or even a pair of sturdy sawhorses. (If needs be, you can construct those yourself first, using the same saw.)

The sound impact on the household and neighbors is also commensurately less than a contractor or table saw, if that's a factor.
If you have a shop on a lonely acre, you can test missiles.
If you're putting something together in an apartment or a condo, the pounding on the door will soon outdo the noise of the saw.

And you can take the thing where you need it for other projects.

The other $1200 you didn't spend on the Smart Saw will buy a lot of project lumber.


This, unless you're building bookshelves for a library of course, or canned food shelves for a big-box store. Even a corded circular saw would do you fine. If you're concerned about, for instance, ripping shelves from plywood sheets, most lumber sellers will make cuts for nominal, if any, cost. Then all you need to do is cut to length.

User avatar
MiddleAgedKen
On a list somewhere
Posts: 2396
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 9:11 pm
Location: Flyover Country
Contact:

Re: SafeSaw

Postby MiddleAgedKen » Thu Dec 11, 2014 12:03 am

Netpackrat wrote:
MiddleAgedKen wrote:Perzackly. How do you think child-seat laws got to be ubiquitous?


Or mandatory insurance laws.


Yeah, they're even better -- antitrust exemption thrown in just for laughs. :|
Watergate didn't have a body count.

John_in_Longview
Case Shiner
Posts: 471
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 7:30 pm
Location: East Texas

Re: SafeSaw

Postby John_in_Longview » Fri Dec 12, 2014 3:34 pm

Thanks for the additional replies. Some random comments on some of your comments above:

I should have mentioned that I already have a corded circular saw and a 10' single bevel miter saw.
Noise isn't an issue.
I'll probably build a (another) workbench for it and the miter saw to live on when not in use.

User avatar
Termite
Probably Unemployed
Posts: 8730
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 4:32 am
Location: central Louisiana

Re: SafeSaw

Postby Termite » Fri Dec 12, 2014 6:33 pm

Get one with a 24" fence. It makes life much easier when ripping 4'x8' sheets of plywood.
"Life is a bitch. Shit happens. Adapt, improvise, and overcome. Acknowledge it, and move on."

User avatar
JAG2955
Active Shooter
Posts: 3044
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 10:21 pm

Re: SafeSaw

Postby JAG2955 » Fri Dec 12, 2014 11:27 pm

The last time I had a big-box store make cuts for me, they weren't anywhere close to square. They also ruined the hardwood face on the plywood by the cut because "they're not allowed to change blades", and it was very dull.

I hope my next house will have room for a large cabinet saw.

User avatar
HTRN
Probably Unemployed
Posts: 10855
Joined: Wed Aug 20, 2008 4:05 am
Location: Under your bed with a knife
Contact:

Re: SafeSaw

Postby HTRN » Sun Dec 14, 2014 6:48 am

JAG2955 wrote:I hope my next house will have room for a large cabinet saw.

If I had the money and the space, I'd grab my buddys panel saw..
HTRN, I would tell you that you are an evil fucker, but you probably get that a lot ~ Netpackrat

Describing what HTRN does as "antics" is like describing the wreck of the Titanic as "a minor boating incident" ~ First Shirt

User avatar
NVGdude
Trigger Junkie
Posts: 1705
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 3:39 am
Location: Arizona

Re: SafeSaw

Postby NVGdude » Tue Dec 23, 2014 4:54 am

PawPaw wrote:If it works for you, then it works. Though, I've been using table saws for years, and I have my all my fingers. Actually, with most table saws today, accidents are pretty rare, and if you're counting on the safety features of a saw to keep your fingers out of the blade, you probably won't be counting with all your fingers for long.

Table saws are dangerous, so you've got to keep your head in the game so that your fingers don't fall on the floor.



This. My father is a professional cabinetmaker and has been since 1968 or so. Managed to put his thumb into his table-saw blade anyway about 3 years back. (got lucky, opened it up like a burst hotdog but didn't actually sever anything important)

Complacency is always a bigger issue than safety gee-gaws.

morsetaper
Case Shiner
Posts: 243
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 2:56 am
Location: MOSBY'S CONFEDERACY

Re: SafeSaw

Postby morsetaper » Mon Jan 11, 2016 10:19 pm

If crosscuts in the middle of long boards isn't an issue, then a good bandsaw will handle just about anything else. Just not as quickly. A bandsaw will also do things that a tablesaw can't. And it's inherently less dangerous.

About the only time I turn on the tablesaw anymore is if I'm faced with a long ripping session on 8/4 maple.


Return to “Tech Talk”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests